Blue economy sectors

Tourism is the island’s most important source of income, contributing to approximately 35% of the GDP, and closing 2019 with 16.45 million tourists. Even though arrivals have decreased 0.6%, tourist spending increased 1.4% last year to 16.51 billion euros, the highest historical value. The average stay is 6 days and the most popular time of the year is June to September. Most of the tourists come from the UK and Germany. The management of the increase in tourist arrivals along with the climate-related hazards (heat waves, flooding) are the main concerns to be addressed by the stakeholders.

Tourist number mainly know one direction of development: upwards. The Balearics benefit from the global trend as well as from shift in tourism in the Mediterranean Sed. During the crisis, global tourism took a dent, only to recover at full speed very early on. Growth then stagnated and tourist number stayed at a very high level until they were boosted again in 2016, mainly benefiting from the shift in tourism away from Turkey and, to some extent, Egypt. Total number now are well exceeding 10 million tourists per year. The main reasons for tourism on the Balearics are the natural beauty, landscapes and beaches.

Production in the Blue Economy sector aquaculture is increasing, but at very low speed, and has very low importance in terms of economic weight in this region (10.8 M€ in 2014).

The passenger’s ships with positive growth rates and positively growing revenues in the islands are cruise ships, a holiday activity with a rapidly growing market. However, the freight maritime transport is even more important. They provide paramount sources such as fuels, food, building material, consumer goods such as cars etc mostly arriving from the Mainland. The maritime transport is principally operated by the 5 most important ports of the Islands (Alcúdia, Eivissa, Maó, Palma and La Savina) which are managed by Puertos del Estado. 

Balearic Islands electricity system comprises two smaller-sized subsystems which are electrically isolated, Majorca-Menorca and Ibiza-Formentera, which make it difficult to achieve similar stability and service quality indexes as those systems which are larger and interconnected. For this reason, the national company Red Eléctrica undertook an interconnection project to provide a link with the transmission grid on the Spanish peninsula.

In 2016 the two electricity subsystems of the Balearic Islands are finally connected by the Majorca-Ibiza double electricity link. At the time of its commissioning, this interconnection link is the longest and deepest submarine link in alternating current of its kind in the world, as the submarine cable rests on the seafloor at depths of up to 800 meters. The Majorca-Ibiza submarine interconnection also provides advantages of an environmental nature and also cost savings for the electricity system as a whole. Although this is the major development project in the Balearic Islands, there are other interconnection projects between islands that will connect Majorca to Menorca and Ibiza to Formentera.” Therefore, the Balearic Islands are less inclined for own solutions, compared to more isolated Islands. However, only this year, 2019, the Government of the Balearic Islands has decided to meet the energy demands on Mallorca, Menorca, Ibiza and Formentera with 10% renewables by 2020, 35% by 2030 and 100% by 2050.

Currently, 80MW PV are installed, thus the plan can be called rather ambitious. To support PV development, existing car parks will be required to install PV as well as every new building. Estimates exist which foresee 230 MW of PV being currently in the pipeline, which will bring RE shares in the Baleares to 10% (PV Magazine, 2019).

Short description

Short description

In 1469, Ferdinand II of Aragon (king of Aragon) and Isabella I of Castile (queen of Castile) were married. After their deaths, their respective territories (until then governed separately) were governed jointly, in the person of their grandson, the Emperor Charles V....

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Local Working group

Local Working group

The following partners are involved in the study of the Balearic Islands: UNIVERSITAT DE LES ILLES BALEARS – (UIB CLIMATE) UNIVERSITAT DE LES ILLES BALEARS – (CAIB – CLIMATE CHANGE) UNIVERSIDAD DE CASTILLA LA MANCHA (UCLM) The following partners and...

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